Ecology

Gedi Ruins Ecology

Gedi Ruins Ecology

The surrounding environment of the Gedi Ruins is a tropical forest. Despite the fact that is looks very interesting, the tropical forest breaks down organic material faster than any other terrestrial biome. The muggy, wet climate is another factor that has contributed to the breakdown of these magnificent structures, thus limiting some types of artifacts that may have been preserved in a dryer climate. The forest is maintained by 1,100mm of rainfall annually. There is over 50 indigenous tree species in this Kenyan forest. Even though the environment decomposes very rapidly, there are at least 14 homes still intact. The thick brush surrounding Gedi may have acted as protection as it hid them from possible invaders. This is evident due to the fact that many other cultures of that time near the Gedi ruins have not mentioned it in any of their writings. One of the theories as to why Gedi was evacuated was a lack of water, which seems unlikely due to the nature of the environment, which points us toward the theory that they were driven out by a foreign invader.